K-2nd History

April 13, 2021 Summary

Today we moved away from Europe and Asia into a whole new area of the world—South America! After reviewing some of our map and recent lessons, we talked about the Incas and the lost city of Machu Pichu. We learned about how they didn’t have a written language or use wheels and huge machines to build the amazing roads and cities they built. We watched a short video about them and about the lost city of Manchu Pichu. It did briefly mention their gods and human sacrifice, which we talked about. They had to make their gods happy in order to get rain and have good crops. They had to offer gifts or sacrifices. But our God—the one true God—doesn’t make us give Him gifts so He’ll be happy. He loves us so much and cares about our lives, even when we don’t obey. That is VERY different from the Incan false gods.

Then we talked about the bright, colorful fabrics the Incas wove in beautiful patterns. I sent a sheet home of patterns they can color to imitate how the Incan patterns would be. Then we did paper weaving since weaving was how they made their fabrics. It’s tricky to get at first, but most of the kids caught on quickly!

NOTE: Next week we’ll be talking about the Black Plague/Black Death—scary and yucky and kind of appropriate for the year we’ve had. I will obviously not dive into the gruesome details of that horrible disease but we will talk about it. If you have any concerns at all about how your child will handle it, please let me know!

HOMEWORK:

1st grade

  • Read lesson 24 (Incas) and discuss the questions

  • Write or draw a picture about 2 or 3 things you learned about the Incas

2nd grade

  • Read lesson 24 (Incas) and discuss the questions

  • Fill in the Lesson 24 outline

  • Write or draw a picture about 2 or 3 things you learned about the Incas

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April 6, 2021 Summary

Marco!....Polo!.... Today we traveled with Marco Polo! Many kids know his name from their days at the pool, so it was fun to talk about who he actually was. We started by adding him to our timeline. Then we traced his route on our map and talked about how many years he traveled (24!). He saw many new things on his journeys and a book was written about his travels. Some people think much of what he talked about was made up, but many others believe it’s true.

We watched a video about Marco Polo and his travels into China and meeting the leader, Kublai Khan. Then we went outside (such a beautiful day for this!) and walked the Silk Road around the parking lot to discover the things he saw on his journeys. We started in Italy and took coin money and our camels and compass with us. Then we collected jewels (which he sewed hidden into his pauper clothes to keep from being robbed), silk, a kite (he saw them in China and told people about them at home), and paper money (much lighter than carrying heavy coins!). We also saw the giant dragon lizard he saw (crocodile) and unicorn pig (rhino), but we didn’t bring those home to Italy with us!

We finished with trying some orange sherbet—Marco Polo is said to have brought the recipe idea back to Italy.

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • read lesson 23 (Genghis Khan, Kublai Khan, Marco Polo) and discuss the questions

  • draw a picture or write about what you learned about Marco Polo

  • Optional: watch a video, look online, or read a book with a parent to learn about the Great Wall of China (we didn’t have time to learn about this in class, but while we’re in China, it would be nice to mention it)

  • Optional: look at Pinterest or online and do a Great Wall activity (build it with Legos, sugar cubes, etc., or trace it on a map of China)

2nd grade:

  • read lesson 23 (Genghis Khan, Kublai Khan, Marco Polo) and discuss the questions

  • draw a picture or write about what you learned about Marco Polo

  • Complete the lesson 23 outline

  • Optional: watch a video, look online, or read a book with a parent to learn about the Great Wall of China (we didn’t have time to learn about this in class, but while we’re in China, it would be nice to mention it)

  • Optional: look at Pinterest or online and do a Great Wall activity (build it with Legos, sugar cubes, etc., or trace it on a map of China)

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March 30, 2021 Summary

Today we finished up much of our Medieval unit with learning about 2 brothers who were kings and were very different: King Richard and King John. Some of the kids were familiar with those names, especially after I mentioned another person from that time period: Robin Hood! We talked about how he was probably a real person (or based on a real person), but that even though some of the things he’s known for could have happened during this time period, most of the stories we know about him are probably made up. Many were very familiar with the “fox” version of Robin Hood (thanks Disney!)—they’ve been learning some history even if they didn’t realize it. 😊 Then we watched 2 videos about the Crusades and Robin Hood.

We also learned a little bit about art during this time and the artist Giotto. Since many people couldn’t read and didn’t have access to printed Bibles, art was created to show Bible stories. We looked at some stained-glass windows here at NBC and could recognize stories by the pictures without reading any words. Then the kids created some “stained glass” art on the scratch paper.

Here are the 2 videos in class (spotty internet service caused at least one class to miss out on the videos):

Crusades (4 min): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLjo5kiTJRM&list=PLlxwNhSkzqrCC_DwwvklnwGgA1e-AlJ5G&index=94&t=5s

Robin Hood (5 min): https://www.youtube.com/watch?

v=i6Qbqolc50E&list=PLlxwNhSkzqrCC_DwwvklnwGgA1e-AlJ5G&index=95&t=190s

 

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read lessons 20 (Crusades), 21 (King John), and 22 (Giotto) and discuss the questions.

  • Draw a picture or write about something you learned.

  • Read a story or watch a video about Robin Hood.

2nd grade:

  • Read lessons 20 (Crusades), 21 (King John), and 22 (Giotto) and discuss the questions.

  • Draw a picture or write about something you learned.

  • Complete the outlines for lessons 20, 21, and 22.

  • Read a story or watch a video about Robin Hood.

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March 23, 2021 Summary

What a fun day! Our Medieval Festival was wonderful and the things the kids brought to share were so great! It was so fun to see all the thinking and projects they did over Spring Break. We had multiple amazing costumes, castles, food, and weapons.

After sharing the projects, we had a Medieval Festival obstacle relay. The kids had to jump the moat, throw the javelin, fight the dragon, and ride their horse back to the beginning to tag their partner. It felt like a true cloudy, windy day on the English countryside. 😊

(Unfortunately, the afternoon rain came and forced the PM classes inside to do the course in an extra classroom.)

Then we finished with a feast. We had bread, grapes, grape juice in goblets, and Chessmen cookies, as well as any food the kids brought to share with the class. The kids all got a dragon to take home and a crown to decorate as time allows (we ended up not having time in class to work on those).

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read lessons 18 (King Arthur) and 19 (Medieval Life) and talk about the questions

  • Draw a picture or write about 2 things you learned about Medieval Life

2nd grade:

  • Read lessons 18 (King Arthur) and 19 (Medieval Life) and talk about the questions

  • Fill in the outlines for lessons 18 and 19

  • Write 3 sentences about what you learned about Medieval Life. What would you like about it? What would you not like about it?

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March 2, 2021 Summary

Today we started learning about the Middle Ages/Medieval Times. There is so much to learn about this time and so we’ll spend two weeks on it—including a Medieval Festival when we return from Spring Break!

First, we talked about the Middle Ages and what types of people and things we think of when we think of that time. Kings, queens, knights, swords, shields, castles, fighting… We looked at designs of shields and compared them with Viking shields, which were round. Then we watched several videos (which I’ll link to below) about castles and life in the Middle Ages. We even got to see what some kids thought about trying different foods from that time. While we watched the videos, the kids designed and worked on their own shields. They were so creative and the shields turned out great!

***NOTE***MARCH 23*** The Tuesday we return from Spring Break will be our Medieval Festival. This will be a fun day to learn about and share projects about the Middle Ages. I will bring some food representing that time and we will do an activity. But it will also be a time for the kids to share something they’ve learned over Spring Break. I know everyone’s break is different regarding busyness, so I’m including some ideas for the kids to create/learn about and share on March 23, but it is not meant to overwhelm over our break. They can be as complex or simple as your break time allows.

  • come dressed as someone from the Middle Ages (king, queen, nobility, peasant, knight) (be mindful of weather that day!)

  • bring a food that they would have eaten during the Middle Ages (please be mindful of nut allergies)

  • design and create your own castle to share with the class (you can make it with whatever materials you want and whatever size, as long as it’s manageable to bring to SHARE) We’ll have a castle “tour.”

  • create a sword (needs to be “safe” materials for SHARE)

  • learn about something from the Middle Ages (knights, castles, weapons, etc) and create a project telling about it (posterboard, diorama, mobile, etc)

  • ANY other ideas you have to share with us what you’ve been learning

Middle Ages Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1k-LhWB4QaA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUme01ZA714

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXXDThkJ3Ew

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIp-iO1Lhc4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zqOXN-cuqI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AesgRREuCQI

 

HOMEWORK FOR ALL CLASSES/GRADES:

Work on your project/idea to bring to the Festival on March 23

 

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February 23, 2021 Summary

First, thank you for all the sweet Valentine cards, candy, and gifts! It’s so fun to see the kids’ excitement of swapping Valentines and I’m so thankful for this SHARE community. We have such wonderful families!

What a beautiful day to be back at SHARE! I hope everyone had a relaxing, fun time playing in the snow during our week off. I received several emails with pictures of students and their Viking creations. They did some amazing work! If you have photos you’d like to share, I’d love to see them and hope to include some in our yearbook.

Today we continued talking about Vikings. We colored a map of where they first lived and the places they moved to and/or raided. We also talked about Leif Ericsson and how his dad was Eric the Red. We talked about names and how most didn’t have last names like we do, but they were called “…the Red” or “…the Great.” Or they were named after their dad, like Leif was Eric’s son. In our class, that meant we had a Brandonson and Ronson. 😊

Next we practiced drawing a long boat and discussed why they were such a special kind of boat. (If a class didn’t get a chance to do that, I sent home the step-by-step instructions on how to draw one.)

We also watched a video about Vikings and heard some familiar names: Leif Ericsson, Eric the Red, and William the Conqueror. We finished class by playing a round or two of our Viking game, Kubb.

Next week: the Middle Ages!

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • read lesson 16 (book 2) Leif Ericsson and the Vikings and discuss the questions

  • draw one thing you learned about the Vikings

2nd Grade:

  • read lesson 16 (book 2) Leif Ericsson and the Vikings and discuss the questions

  • complete the lesson 16 (book 2) outline

  • draw one thing you learned about the Vikings

Optional:

  • try an activity from last week’s post

  • do the word search

  • do the Viking long boat worksheet—learn the parts of the boat

  • do the Viking V maze

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February 16, 2021 Summary

Happy Snow Day! I hope you're all enjoying the snow and staying warm! 

 

I was excited to do our Viking study today at SHARE and am going to plan on doing it next week instead, when we can be together. So, this week I'm posting a few activities for our Viking study that we won't have time for in class. Hope this allows some fun snow time or cozy game and movie time with your family! 

 

Optional ideas:

 

  • Read a book about Vikings or Leif Ericsson (here are some ideas): 

  1. Viking Raiders--Usborne Time Traveler Series

  2. Who Were the Vikings?--Usborne

  3. Leif the Lucky--Ingri and Edgar D'Aulaire

  • Watch a youtube video about Vikings (preview some videos for kids to see if they're appropriate for your child)

  • Watch Lyle the Kindly Viking (VeggieTales)

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February 9, 2021 Summary

It’s so wonderful to be together at SHARE for another week! Today we reviewed some places on our world map, starting with finding the United States. We added several pictures to our timeline. Then we talked about Charlemagne and how he was a king and then was crowned the emperor (Holy Roman Emperor). We found Europe on the map to show where he lived and ruled. Next we talked about William the Conqueror and what a “conqueror” is. He took over England, which started many years of fighting between England and France.

Even though we “skipped” over lesson 16 (Vikings) and plan to cover it next week, we did start learning about the Vikings by talking about where they're from and ending class playing a traditional Viking game, Kubb. We played this several years ago in geography when learning about Scandinavia. The students who were here then remembered it. (Although mine is made of paper since we’re indoors, you can actually buy a yard game version of Kubb that is made of wood. Fun times!)

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read lessons 15 (Charlemagne) and 17 (William the Conqueror) and discuss the questions

  • Draw a picture or write about something you learned

2nd grade:

  • Read lessons 15 (Charlemagne) and 17 (William the Conqueror) and discuss the questions

  • Fill in the outline for lessons 15 and 17 (book 2)

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February 2, 2021 Summary

Today we took a break from discussing new events and people in history and did some review and geography. It was a great day! The kids did such a good job remembering history from WAY back at the beginning of the school year. First, we looked at a world map and talked about where we are (USA) compared to where most of the history we’ve learned so far has been happening (Europe, Egypt, Mediterranean). The conversation turned to the “huge” place at the top of the map (Russia) and other parts of the map. It was a great discussion! Then we played a review game, moving through the history we’ve learned to this point. I do want to mention what amazing attitudes we had with a win/lose game—the kids were encouraging and positive, whether they were winning or losing. YAY!!!

**REMEMBER: next week we will have our Valentine Day exchange. See Mrs. Christy's email for class lists. Bring a small bag or box to collect your valentines in. 

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read lessons 13 and 14 (book 2) (Justinian and Mohammed) and talk about the discussion questions.

2nd grade:

  • Read lessons 13 and 14 (book 2) (Justinian and Mohammed) and talk about the discussion questions.

  • Fill in the outlines for lessons 13 and 14 (book 2).

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January 26, 2021 Summary

It was so good to be back at SHARE for a second week in a row! We started by adding several pictures to our timelines. (Please be sure these are in your child’s history binder each week since we add to them each week—we are using the colored cardstock timeline for this semester.)

Then we talked about Attila the Hun, king of the Huns. We looked at his picture on our timeline and did an activity to compare him with Saint Benedict and Pope Gregory, who were also on our timeline. They were opposites and we talked about what that means. We did a comparison on the board with pictures and the kids decided if the image went with the Huns or with the monks. The Huns were a group who used weapons like swords and bows and arrows to attack neighboring groups of people. They rode horses from place to place and burned and robbed villages. If they wanted food or money, they stole it. NOT a nice group of people.

The monks lived in huge monasteries and wanted to obey God. They cared for travelers and sick people. They gave money to the poor and shared with others. The monks planted gardens and made their own food. They spent a lot of time copying books (like the Bible) for others to read.

We also watched a video visiting a monastery to get a quick idea of how monks live and what they eat. Ask your kids if they can remember how many meals they eat each day and what they eat.

**REMEMBER** Please sign your child’s progress report and return it to SHARE. Also, if you haven’t done so, now is a great time to clean out your child’s backpack and yellow folder (make sure the yellow folder comes back to SHARE each week!) to make room for all the other fun things coming home this semester. Most supplies are kept at SHARE in each child’s individual supply box, but check to confirm that they do have their art shirt in a Ziploc in their backpacks as well. Thank you!

HOMEWORK:

1st grade

  • Read lessons 10, 11, and 12 (book 2) (Attila the Hun, St. Benedict, and Pope Gregory) and discuss the questions at the end

  • Draw a picture or write about 1 thing you learned, or make your own comparison chart of the differences between the Huns and the monks (like we did in class)

2nd grade

  • Read lessons 10, 11, and 12 (book 2) (Attila the Hun, St. Benedict, and Pope Gregory) and discuss the questions at the end

  • Fill in the outline for lessons 10, 11, and 12 (book 2)

  • Make a comparison chart (like we did in class) of 2 or 3 things about the Huns and 2 or 3 things about monks

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January 19, 2021 Summary

Welcome back!! I can’t believe it’s been 2 months since we’ve been together, but it was so good to be back today with the all the kids!

We started our new semester by adding to a new timeline. We added the pictures for last week’s and this week’s lessons. We noticed that even though most of our timeline pictures are of people, this week included a mountain—a volcano, to be exact. We talked about why a volcano would be included in our history lessons. Maybe because this one erupted and covered an entire town!

I read part of a story (Pompeii: Buried Alive) and we watched some of the story being read on a video. We talked about what the town of Pompeii was like before Vesuvius erupted, while it was erupting, and after it erupted. Also, we tried to remember that Pompeii is the town and Vesuvius (with a V) is the volcano (with a V). Because of the writings of a man named Pliny and discovery of the town buried underground, we can now know so much about life in Pompeii before and during the eruption.

We ended class by making our own small volcanoes. We didn’t have them erupt yet—we saved that part for home! 😊 I told them all they need is baking soda (to put inside the volcano) and vinegar (to pour inside and make it erupt). They could also add red food coloring to the vinegar to make it look like lava. (There are also versions that include dish soap.) I also reminded them that although most parents have these items on hand, some may have to go to the store and buy an item—so they need to be patient. I suggested they may have their own clay or items like Legos, etc., that they can use to build a small town next to the volcano like Pompeii.

https://happybrownhouse.com/simple-science-how-to-make-a-volcano-with-kids/

 

***SEVERAL THINGS TO NOTE*** Progress reports are coming home this week. Please remember to sign them and return them to SHARE. Also, if you haven’t done so over break, now is a great time to clean out your child’s backpack and yellow folder (make sure the yellow folder comes back to SHARE each week!) to make room for all the other fun things coming home this semester. Most supplies are kept at SHARE in each child’s individual supply box, but check to confirm that they do have their art shirt in a Ziploc in their backpacks as well. Thank you!

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • read the summaries for lessons 7, 8, and 9 (Vesuvius, Nero, and Constantine)

  • Draw a picture or write about 2 things you learned from those lessons

2nd grade:

  • read the summaries for lessons 7, 8, and 9 (Vesuvius, Nero, and Constantine)

  • Fill in the outlines for lessons 7, 8, and 9 (remember, these are labeled as “Book 2”)

Optional: videos about Pompeii (please personally preview to be sure videos and information are not upsetting for your child)

Nat Geo Kids (1 minute): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuCbRPnJRqY&list=PLlxwNhSkzqrCC_DwwvklnwGgA1e-AlJ5G&index=85

Lost City of Pompeii (2½ minutes): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeB5N_bH7E8&list=PLlxwNhSkzqrCC_DwwvklnwGgA1e-AlJ5G&index=86

Pompeii: Buried Alive read aloud (we watched part in class) (11 minutes): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oa2dV8Cg4V4&t=506s

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January 12, 2021 Summary

Well…we’re still not able to be together and I am really missing it! I’m missing the excitement of the kids when they see their friends at SHARE and the enthusiasm they have when we learn about history and do projects and play games. Hopefully we’ll be together soon and can continue and end this school year on a high note!

This week’s plan is to go over lessons 4-6 (book 2). Remember that the summaries of those lessons are in your child’s history binder. We’ve made it to AD in history and this week we’re studying the lessons about Jesus, Peter, and Paul. Keep in mind that there are discussion questions with each lesson summary, as well as other topics to dive in to and books to read.

Below, I’ll include the homework for this week, as well as videos and several crafts (pick as many or few as you want based on your time and supplies you have available).

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read the summaries for lessons 4, 5, and 6 (book 2) (Jesus Christ, Peter, Paul)

  • Write about or draw a picture of your favorite miracle Jesus performed or your favorite parable He told

2nd grade:

  • Read the summaries for lessons 4, 5, and 6 (book 2) (Jesus Christ, Peter, Paul)

  • Fill in the lesson outlines for 4, 5, and 6 (book 2)

  • Write about or draw a picture of your favorite miracle Jesus performed or your favorite parable He told

OPTIONAL:

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November 17, 2020 Summary

I hope you all have had a relaxing day at home! Of course, 2020 is a year of flexibility and changes in plans. Today was actually going to be a review day for us and I planned to read a book on Hanukkah and play a review game with the kids.

When we meet again, we’ll be starting the summaries that correspond with Book 2 of our 5-book history series. Because it begins with Caesar and Jesus, I wanted to spend a short time going over the “in-between” part of what we usually read about in our Old and New Testaments. Since we’ve been following the Jewish nation for much of the 1st semester, I wanted to discuss Judas Maccabee and the holiday of Hanukkah. I planned to read a story, but I’m attaching a History Channel video here if you want to watch it. It’s probably more suited for older kids, but it’s a short, simple summary of the lesson. It’s totally optional if you want to watch it or not.

Other than that, there are no new summaries or outlines for this week. But if you have time and resources, it would be a great chance to talk about some of the things your child has learned this first semester as we get ready to move on into the next unit. (And how are we already almost to mid-year?!)

History of the Holidays: Hanukkah: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6FBX53ZblU

Have a wonderful, safe, and healthy Thanksgiving!

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November 10, 2020 Summary

Eureka! Today we talked about Archimedes and some of the things he contributed to science and history. So, today’s lesson had a little of each—science and history.  We discussed how Archimedes was asked by the king to help him determine whether a crown was fully gold or if it contained any silver. And since Archimedes must have done his best thinking in the bath, that was where he suddenly came up with the solution to solve that problem. This led us to trying out some experiments with water displacement (a big word!) and noticing how the water level in a container rises when objects are added to it. We also did some experimenting with sinking and floating. Then we finished our time building a simple catapult in honor of Archimedes, since he helped make that weapon of war better.

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • read lessons 22 (Archimedes), 23 (Hannibal), and 24 (Judas Maccabee)

  • draw a picture about something you learned from one of those lessons

2nd grade:

  • read lessons 22 (Archimedes), 23 (Hannibal), and 24 (Judas Maccabee)

  • complete the outlines for lessons 22, 23, and 24

 

Optional ideas:

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November 3, 2020 Summary

Happy Election Day! Today we spent our time learning about the (simple version) voting process. We didn’t vote for president, since they’re not 18, but we did do a mock election to vote for a treat for snack time next week.

First we read a book (I Voted) and talked about how we vote and what happens. Some voting is easy (ice cream vs onions) and sometimes it’s harder (ice cream vs cupcakes). And whichever thing gets the most votes wins, even if it’s not the one we chose. Then we read Duck for President and did a practice vote of choosing whether we would rather have Duck or Farmer Brown in charge. They tallied the votes in their class and made a bar graph of the results.

Then it was time for our real vote! I gave each voter their voter registration card to take with them to the polls. When they arrived, they were given the ballot to choose either ice cream with sprinkles or donuts for a treat next week. The kids realized they needed to ask questions for details about the treats so they would better know how to vote. They learned information is important! Then they secretly voted in the booth and put their ballot in the ballot box. When they were finished, they each got an I Voted sticker. I will count the votes and post them by this evening so the kids know how the voting turned out.

** Please remember to sign and return progress reports! We're still missing a few. Also, please clean out your child's yellow folder and backpack to remove old papers and projects. This makes it easier for them to find what they need and fit their items inside. **

SHARE VOTING RESULTS:

AM: ice cream with sprinkles won 13-9

PM: ice cream with sprinkles won 10-2

HOMEWORK: (found in yellow folders)

1st grade:

  • read and fill out the “Let’s Register to Vote” sheet. This talks about how we need to tell who we are and where we live before we actually go to vote.

  • Complete Election Day Word Search

  • read and complete “What is an election?”

 

2nd grade:

  • read and fill out the “Let’s Register to Vote” sheet. This talks about how we need to tell who we are and where we live before we actually go to vote.

  • Complete Election Day Crossword

  • read and complete “What is an election?”

  • Complete the My President Project sheet. Choose any US president and fill out the top part (include a picture). Then write/fill in the Interesting Facts about their life (2-3 facts) and any other section you want to do. This doesn’t have to be very involved. They will quickly share it with the class next week, but they don’t need every section filled in—mostly just the top info and several interesting facts.

 

Please let me know if you have any questions! adamandlisag@gmail.com or 615-972-3436

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October 27, 2020 Summary

Today we talked about Alexander the Great. There is so much to learn about this very famous person, and it’s difficult to find books or videos that are the appropriate length (and appropriate material) for kids. So I chose to focus on a story about his childhood and then do a broad overview of his desire and attempt to conquer the world.

First, we added the final pictures (printed from Book 1) to our time lines. We’ll cover some in the next several weeks. Then we read a story about 8-year-old Alexander and his horse, Bucephalus. We also talked about how he wanted to conquer the known world of his time. It was a good opportunity to review some other lessons and to talk about how God is “the Great” One and truly controls the world.

We also painted handprints and turned them into horses to help us remember the famous story of Alexander and Bucephalus. They turned out so cute!

Next week we’ll be doing a mock election for Election Day. We’ll briefly talk about how elections work, and the kids will get a chance to vote and learn about results of elections (one being, we don’t always get what we voted for!). We won’t be voting for president though, since we’re kids! Instead the kids will be voting for a fun treat.

HOMEWORK:

1st grade

  • read the summaries for lessons 19 (Socrates), 20 (Aristotle), and 21 (Alexander the Great).

  • Discuss the questions together at the end of the lessons.

  • Draw or write 2 things that you learned from the lessons.

2nd grade

  • read the summaries for lessons 19 (Socrates), 20 (Aristotle), and 21 (Alexander the Great).

  • Discuss the questions together at the end of the lessons.

  • Fill in the lesson outlines for lessons 19-21.

 

Optional activities:

  • try working on some logic puzzles

  • play a Jeopardy-like game with your family where the answer is in the form of a question (Socrates’ method of teaching)

  • learn some Greek words and their meanings that we use in some of our words (I have enjoyed going through the English from the Roots Up flashcards with my children, which has helped them determine meanings of unknown English words by knowing Greek and Latin roots)

  • Try making a paper horse that walks. (I’d love to hear if anyone tried this at home and how it went.) https://frugalfun4boys.com/paper-horse-that-walks/

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October 20, 2020 Summary

Today we continued our study of Greece. We talked about how Greece was still the power in the world at that point in history. First, we added pictures to our timelines: Buddha (cut out last week), Ezra, Xerxes, and Pericles. Then we watched a video on Ancient Greece and the Parthenon. Some classes also watched a humorous, catchy video about the Battle of Marathon. With some classes we talked about Pheidippides, who ran the first marathon to announce to Athens that they had beaten the Persians. Ask your 1st and 2nd graders if they can tell you what happened after he ran and made the announcement.

We spent the rest of class creating some clay pottery and adding designs. (This is air-dry clay that should dry and harden if left out.) We talked about Greek architecture and designs. I told the kids to try to notice building this week with columns on the front, which is taken from Greek design. Several kids said they have columns like that on their houses.

Below are the videos we watched in class in case you’d like to watch them at home.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUZKg3KdtYo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkI9lbmTyg0&t=8s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNAxqaoPLO0&list=PLlxwNhSkzqrCC_DwwvklnwGgA1e-AlJ5G&index=79

 

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • read the summaries for lessons 15 (Buddha), 16 (Zerubbabel), 17 (Xerxes), and 18 (Pericles).

  • Answer/talk about some of the discussion questions after the lessons

  • Draw a picture of something you learned from your reading.

  • IF ABSENT: add Buddha, Ezra, Xerxes, and Pericles to your timeline.

2nd grade:

  • read the summaries for lessons 15 (Buddha), 16 (Zerubbabel), 17 (Xerxes), and 18 (Pericles).

  • Fill in the outlines for lessons 15, 16, 17, and 18.

  • Answer/talk about some of the discussion questions after the lessons

  • Draw a picture of something you learned from your reading.

  • IF ABSENT: add Buddha, Ezra, Xerxes, and Pericles to your timeline.

Please let me know if you have any questions! adamandlisag@gmail.com or 615-972-3436

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October 6, 2020 Summary

Fun times in history today! We read some fables and played a review game. This week’s lessons were on Jonah, Babylon (Daniel), and Aesop. We added those pictures to our timelines. Then we discussed a little about the story of Jonah. Then on to Aesop! Even though the kids may not have heard of Aesop, many were familiar with some of his fables. We talked about fables and that they are stories (usually with animals as characters) that teach a lesson (moral). We read the “Tortoise and the Hare” and the “Lion and the Mouse” together. Finally, we played a review game with the “Wheel of Fortune” spinner I brought. The kids did a great job of remembering details from the past lessons!

I hope everyone has a safe, healthy, happy fall break!

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • read lesson summaries Jonah (lesson 12), Nebuchadnezzar (lesson 13), and Aesop (lesson 14).

  • Discuss questions together.

2nd grade:

  • read lesson summaries Jonah (lesson 12), Nebuchadnezzar (lesson 13), and Aesop (lesson 14).

  • Discuss questions together.

  • fill in outlines for lessons 12, 13, and 14.

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September 29, 2020 Summary

Today was the perfect day to be outside for some Olympics! We briefly talked about Homer, who was a famous writer from Greece. I brought in my Greek flag to look at and compare with our American flag. Since we weren’t going to cover Homer’s greatest works (The Iliad and The Odyssey are a little much!), we talked about something that started in Greece around the time he lived: the Olympic Games! We watched a short video about the early Olympic Games. And then we went outside on this beautiful day to compete in some events. We had a javelin throw (with a wrapping paper roll), a relay race where the kids passed the baton to their teammates, and a long jump competition. The kids did a great job cheering each other on! Then we came inside and they were awarded a medal (which Olympians receive in our modern games) and an olive leaf wreath crown (which the Olympians received in the ancient games). It was a great day and was the perfect time to be active outside.

 

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read the summary about Homer (lesson 11) and talk about the discussion questions.

  • Find a video or book to watch/read about the Olympics or Ancient Greece. (Keep in mind to preview any videos/books you show, since it was traditional for Greeks to compete in the nude and there are plenty of drawings and statues that pop up in videos and books about Greece with nude bodies. You also know best what your child can understand about discussion of Greek gods, etc. in the videos/books.)

  • Write or draw something you learned about Ancient Greece/Homer/the Olympics.

2nd grade:

  • Read the summary about Homer (lesson 11) and talk about the discussion questions.

  • Complete the lesson 11 outline/fill-in.

  • Find a video or book to watch/read about the Olympics or Ancient Greece. (Keep in mind to preview any videos/books you show, since it was traditional for Greeks to compete in the nude and there are plenty of drawings and statues that pop up in videos and books about Greece with nude bodies. You also know best what your child can understand about discussion of Greek gods, etc. in the videos/books.)

  • Write or draw something you learned about Ancient Greece/Homer/the Olympics.

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September 22, 2020 Summary

Happy Fall!

Today we talked about Samuel and David. We started by adding our next 3 pictures to our timeline: Samuel, David, and Elijah. There’s not enough time in class to talk about all of them, so I hope you’re getting the opportunity to read the summaries each week (even kindergarten, if possible!) and/or looking through other books/Bibles to learn more about what we learn in class.

We talked about how Samuel was a prophet who told the people about what God wanted for them. Israel wanted a king, even though God should have been their King. After Saul began to disobey God more, God planned for another king to replace him. We talked about how people would be anointed with oil to show that they would be the next king. David was chosen. Then we got to the part that most everyone could have taught for me! Goliath! This led us to talking about some of the weapons people used to fight with in battles long ago. One was a sword (which Saul tried to give David to fight with, and that Goliath fought with). The other was a slingshot. Since I didn’t want to send the kids home with weapons from SHARE, we made the pouch that would go with the slingshot to carry the stones. Then we added 5 paper stones with the words “The battle is the Lord’s” to remind us of this truth, which David remembered when he went against Goliath.

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read the summaries for lessons 8 (Samuel), 9 (David), and 10 (Elijah) and discuss the questions.

  • Find Israel on a map.

  • Draw a picture or write about something you learned from each lesson.

2nd grade:

  • Read the summaries for lessons 8 (Samuel), 9 (David), and 10 (Elijah) and discuss the questions.

  • Find Israel on a map.

  • Fill in the outlines for lessons 8, 9, and 10.

Optional activities:

  • make a sling to go with your pouch

  • memorize Psalm 23

  • make a sheep craft (check Pinterest for an idea to use supplies you have on hand) and talk about how Jesus is our Good Shepherd and what that means

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September 15, 2020 Summary

It was another great day at SHARE! Today we started a science experiment in history. First we added King Tut to our timelines. Then we talked about what makes him so special. He was a boy king—he became pharaoh when he was only 8 or 9 years old! But he didn’t necessarily do amazing things. He didn’t rule a long time (only about 10 years). What makes him so famous is that we found his tomb—with his treasure and him in it! We talked about how tomb robbers often stole the treasures of the pharaohs, so we can’t see it to study how they lived. But when people found King Tut’s tomb, everything was still there. That has helped us learn so much! We read a book about pyramids and looked at some books about King Tut. We noticed that he’s usually the mummy/pharaoh/sarcophagus we picture when we think of them.

Then we started our experiment! Each child got 3 apple slices. We left the first one alone (this is our “control” apple). We put the second one in a baggie of salt. We talked about how salt is used to preserve things (like meat before there was refrigeration). We took the third apple slice and put it in salt and then wrapped it in gauze to make our apple mummy. The kids took guesses (made a hypothesis) about which slice was going to get gross and rotten first. Their “job” this week is to watch the apple slices and then unwrap and observe them before next Tuesday. You can use the link below (or google) to see how others perform their experiment and record their results. If you have apples at home, you can even try using other things to “preserve” your mummy.

HOMEWORK: (**I've loved seeing all the creativity the kids have shown in doing some of the optional activities! Keep it up!)

1st grade:

  • Read the Lesson 7 King Tut summary and discuss questions.

  • Observe and draw a picture of your apple mummy results.

  • Do the Map of Ancient Egypt worksheet (yellow folder).

2nd grade:

  • Read the Lesson 7 King Tut summary and discuss questions.

  • Fill out the Lesson 7 Outline.

  • Observe and draw a picture of your apple mummy results.

  • Do the Map of Ancient Egypt worksheet (yellow folder).

  • Do the All About Ancient Egypt worksheet (yellow folder).

Optional for ALL grades:

Please let me know if you have any questions! adamandlisag@gmail.com or 615-972-3436

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September 8, 2020 Summary

Today in history we talked about numbers—the number 10 to be exact! We talked about 3 people who obeyed God, even when things weren’t going well. The first was Abraham. In history, he is important as the spiritual father of many groups of people: Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Then we talked about Joseph and how the Israelites came to be in Egypt, where they were later slaves. That led us to Moses, who led the people out of Egypt and to the land that God promised and prepared for the Israelite/Jewish nation. Our number 10 came in when we talked about the 10 plagues—God showed the Egyptians that He was more powerful than all their gods—and they have a lot! God also gave Moses the 10 Commandments, which most cultures throughout history and today base many laws on.

 

We read a The Jesus Storybook Bible together to learn about Abraham, Joseph, and Moses. Then we reviewed the 10 plagues as we ate a plague feast (more like a snack-treat). We had red juice (Nile River to blood), gummy frogs (frogs), Sno Caps (lice/fleas), raisins (flies), animal crackers (dead livestock), Haribo berries (boils), ice and Red Hots (fire and hail), Crunch bars (crunchy locusts), chocolate covered pretzels (darkness), and Sour Patch Kids with graham crackers and red icing (death of firstborn and animal blood covering the doorframes). It was much better to snack on those things than to experience the plagues for real!

Then we talked about another 10—the 10 Commandments. We drew on a rock GOD 1, to remind us that God is first, should be number one, and the first commandment tells us to love God more than anything else. If we do that, we’ll love others well also. We talked about how no one ever has been able to obey God and all the commandments all the time (except Jesus!), but that the commandments help us to know how to live.

 

HOMEWORK:

Kindergarten: As usual, it isn’t required but might be helpful and enjoyable to read the summaries together to reinforce what we talk about and learn in class. This week we’re reading lessons 4, 5, and 6. Also see some ideas below for other activities for these lessons.

1st grade:

  • Read summaries for lessons 4, 5, and 6.

  • Add time line pictures to your time line (you may need to add a page with tape): Abraham, Joseph, Moses (these pictures should be on pages in the history binder—probably toward the back)

  • do the 10 Commandments word search (yellow folder)

  • Try some activities below if you want!

2nd grade:

  • Read summaries for lessons 4, 5, and 6.

  • Complete the outlines/fill-in for lessons 4, 5, and 6.

  • Add time line pictures to your time line (you may need to add a page with tape): Abraham, Joseph, Moses (these pictures should be on pages in the history binder—probably toward the back)

  • Try some activities below if you want!

Extra ideas for all grades:

 

Please let me know if you have any questions! adamandlisag@gmail.com or 615-972-3436

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September 1, 2020 Summary

 

What a great day at SHARE! We’re getting used to our new routine and the kids seemed so relaxed and happy to be here!

Today we started with talking about time lines. We talked about how they show what has happened in history in the order it happened. Then we started our time lines for the year. The kids attached 2 pages together and drew a line through the middle. Then we glued our 3 pictures for the things we’ve learned about in history so far (creation, Noah/flood, Cheops/pyramids). We’ll continue to add to this throughout the year. I sent home the rest of the time line pictures for the 1st semester, which are in their binders. I plan to add them each week in class, but if we don’t have time and they’re not added, you’ll have them to add at home that week if needed.

(I also handed out the rest of the summaries for the year. This way you’ll already have your “book” in case you miss a week. I’ll also send home other items each week, but this is the bulk of what you’ll need.)

Next, we talked some more about the pyramids and pharaohs. We watched a short video about the pyramids of Egypt and mummies. The kids agree that it would be scary to see a real mummy, but we don’t have to worry about them chasing us around, since they can’t do that! We made paper pyramids and wrapped a mummy to add to it. Then we added our treasure!

**I received several pictures of students with their sugar cube pyramids (suggested activity after the summary). I love that so many of you were able to try them. The kids told me they were fun to build.

 

**Please be sure to check your yellow folder each week! Also, remove all papers that do not need to be returned the following week (which is most of them).

HOMEWORK:

ALL (not required but a great video about Egyptian pyramids—Nat Geo Kids Are We There Yet? series is a good one!): watch the video and write or draw one thing you learned

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIt8ZXFev2Y

 

2nd grade:

  • Complete the name hieroglyphics page—try to write your name on the scroll with hieroglyphics

  • Do the pyramid maze

  • Do the Egypt wordsearch

  • Complete the “Decode the hieroglyphic message” sheet (optional)

  • Do the Egypt acrostic poem using words that start with E-G-Y-P-T that are about Egypt (optional)

 

1st grade:

  • Complete the name hieroglyphics page—try to write your name on the scroll with hieroglyphics

  • Do the pyramid maze

Please let me know if you have any questions! adamandlisag@gmail.com or 615-972-3436

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August 25, 2020 Summary

 

Hello parents! Welcome to a new year of SHARE. Today was a great day! There are lots of new friends to meet. This year we’re starting our 4-year history cycle. Today we talked about what history is and that it all started at the beginning with God creating the world. We talked about all the things He created on the different days. I brought bags numbered 1-7 with clues to what was made on that day.

Then we went outside on a nature scavenger hunt to find things that God created. The kids did a great job of keeping their eyes open for items on their list. We came back inside and the kids got to pick out an animal to take home (except 2nd grade AM, which will have to get theirs next week).

I handed out packets for each class to add to their history binder (be sure to check your supply checklist in your yellow folder to see if you were missing your history binder). All classes (K-2) were given the first 13 lessons of summaries, book ideas, discussion questions, etc. (I will be sending home the rest of the year next week—I hope.) Although kindergarten will not have homework, I want you to have these summaries to read with them as you want so they can learn some information at home that we may not have time to cover in class. I also sent home lesson fill-in outlines with the 2nd graders. This covers every lesson for the year. I wanted you to have them in case you’re absent one week, etc. You’ll fill these in throughout the year as I assign them.

**Please be sure to check your yellow folder each week! This week there are several important things, including a history intro letter from me and a K-2 intro letter.

HOMEWORK:

1st grade:

  • Read lessons 1-3 (Adam, Noah, and Cheops)

  • Draw a picture or write about something you learned from each lesson.

  • Extra ideas:

    • take a nature walk.

    • Make a creation poster or the days.

    • paint or draw a rainbow (remember ROY G BIV)

    • make a pyramid out of sugar cubes

2nd grade:

  • Read lessons 1-3 (Adam Noah, and Cheops)

  • Fill in your outlines for lessons 1-3 (you can do this as you’re reading, or wait until you’re done and see how much you can remember)

  • Extra ideas:

    • take a nature walk.

    • Make a creation poster or the days.

    • paint or draw a rainbow (remember ROY G BIV)

    • make a pyramid out of sugar cubes

Please let me know if you have any questions! adamandlisag@gmail.com or 615-972-3436

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Christy Ross

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Northside Baptist Church

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